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Scheduled Events

The Beast of Yucca Flats (1961)

Jul
30
6:00 pm





Wednesday, July 30The-Beast-of-Yucca-Flats-poster-5

Doors at 6 PM

All ages

FREE with minimum $5 food or beverage purchase

Beer and Pizza specials all night long!

The best in B science fictions movies, drive-in classics, psychotronic weirdness and more. A free raffle before the feature include some very cool, very strange science fiction prizes including figurines, posters, books, cards, VHS movies and more for that inner science fiction enthusiast in us all.Sponsored by La Dolce Video, Savage Henry Magazine, Scrap Humboldt, Phantom Wave Records, Daisy Drygoods, Vintage Avenger, Tin Can Mailman, The Clothing Dock and more.

A monstrous killer on the lose!

This horror classic from Coleman Francis involves a tubby Soviet scientist who is pursued by nefarious agents into a nuclear testing area, whereupon an A-bomb blast infuses him with enough radiation to power a small Midwestern town. Supposedly transformed into a rampaging monster, the scientist looks exactly the same, albeit with tattered clothing and a constipated expression. In the fine tradition of The Creeping Terror and Coleman Francis’s own Red Zone Cuba, this is shot with virtually no dialogue and overlaid with hilariously pretentious and obtuse narration… the phrase “a flag on the moon” pops up so often it could be used in a drinking game. Some critics have characterized the film as one of the worst science fiction horror films made, and one of the all-time worst films of any kind, even suggesting that it may be worse than Ed Wood’s legendarily bad Plan 9 from Outer Space.

 


Dirty Harry (1971)

Aug
1
7:30 pm





Friday, August 1DirtyHairyPosterresize 

Doors at 7:30 PM

Movie at 8:00 PM

Film is $5

Rated R

“You’ve got to ask yourself a question: ‘do I feel lucky?’ Well, do ya, punk?”

Harry Callahan (Clint Eastwood, in a role meant for Frank Sinatra) is a sardonic, hard-working San Francisco cop who can’t finish his lunch without having to foil a bank robbery with his 44 Magnum, “the most powerful handgun in the world.” When psycho Scorpio (Andy Robinson) goes on a killing spree, Harry and new partner Chico (Reni Santoni) are assigned to hunt him down, but not before the Mayor (John Vernon) and Lt. Bressler (Harry Guardino) admonish Callahan about his heavy-handed tactics. Racing against a deadline to save a kidnap victim from suffocating to death and unbothered by the niceties of Miranda rights and search warrants, Callahan brings in Scorpio, only to see him released on technicalities. “The law’s crazy,” opines Harry in disgust, before taking it upon himself to ensure that Scorpio doesn’t kill again. Directed in violent and efficient fashion by Don Siegel, with a propulsive score by Lalo Schifrin, Dirty Harry was the fourth Siegel-Eastwood collaboration after Coogan’s Bluff (1968), Two Mules for Sister Sara (1970), and The Beguiled (1970). Critics at the time strongly objected to the heroic image of a cop’s violations of a suspect’s Miranda rights, forcing Siegel and Eastwood to deny that they were right-wing reactionaries. All the same, Dirty Harry proved to be highly popular and spawned four sequels: Magnum Force (1973), The Enforcer (1976), Sudden Impact (1983), and The Dead Pool (1988).

 


Jumanji (1995)

Aug
3
5:30 pm





Sunday, August 3JumanjiPosterresize

Doors at 5:30 PM

Movie at 6:00 PM

Film is $5

Rated PG

It’s all just a game, right?

In 1869, two boys bury a chest in a forest near Keene, New Hampshire. A century later, in 1969, 12-year-old Alan Parrish finds the chest, containing a board game called Jumanji. Alan takes the game home and after his friend Sarah Whittle arrives, the two begin playing Jumanji. When the dice are rolled, the player’s piece moves by itself and a cryptic message appears in a crystal ball in the center of the board. Alan’s first move causes him to get sucked into the game where he becomes trapped … “until the dice roll 5 or 8. Twenty-six years later, in 1995, siblings Judy and Peter Shepherd move into the vacant Parrish house with their aunt Nora after losing their parents in a skiing accident. Lured by Jumanji’s drumbeats, Judy and Peter discover Jumanji and begin playing the game never finished by Alan and Sarah. When Alan is released when Peter rolls a 5, it soon becomes clear that the trio must find Sarah and finish the game together. 

 


Back to the Future (1985)

Aug
6
6:00 pm





Wednesday, August 6back_to_the_future_poster_01resize

Doors at 6 PM

All ages

FREE with minimum $5 food or beverage purchase

Beer and Pizza specials all night long!

The best in B science fictions movies, drive-in classics, psychotronic weirdness and more. A free raffle before the feature include some very cool, very strange science fiction prizes including figurines, posters, books, cards, VHS movies and more for that inner science fiction enthusiast in us all.Sponsored by La Dolce VideoSavage Henry MagazineScrap HumboldtPhantom Wave Records, Daisy Drygoods, Vintage AvengerTin Can MailmanThe Clothing Dock and more.

Shown at 1.21 gigawatts!

“Contemporary high schooler Marty McFly (Michael J. Fox) doesn’t have the most pleasant of lives. Browbeaten by his principal at school, Marty must also endure the acrimonious relationship between his nerdy father (Crispin Glover) and his lovely mother (Lea Thompson), who in turn suffer the bullying of middle-aged jerk Biff (Thomas F. Wilson), Marty’s dad’s supervisor. The one balm in Marty’s life is his friendship with eccentric scientist Doc (Christopher Lloyd), who at present is working on a time machine. Accidentally zapped back into the 1950s, Marty inadvertently interferes with the budding romance of his now-teenaged parents. Our hero must now reunite his parents-to-be, lest he cease to exist in the 1980s. It won’t be easy, especially with the loutish Biff, now also a teenager, complicating matters. Beyond its dazzling special effects, the best element of Back to the Future is the performance of Michael J. Fox, who finds himself in the quagmire of surviving the white-bread 1950s with a hip 1980s mindset. Back to the Future cemented the box-office bankability of both Fox and the film’s director, Robert Zemeckis, who went on to helm two equally exhilarating sequels.” ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

 

 


Ocean Night Film Screening

Aug
7
6:30 pm





Thursday, August 7tumblr_n0lr5eDAjM1r2poeao1_500resize

Doors at 6:30 PM

All ages

$3 suggested donation

Free for OC, Surfrider, and Baykeeper members & children 10 and under.

Every month: Ocean Night Films! From majestic documentaries to epic surf flicks, explore the great blue sea with Northcoast Environmental Center, Humboldt Surfrider, and Humboldt Baykeeper.

Featuring: Angel Azul

“Angel Azul explores the artistic journey of Jason deCaires Taylor, an innovative artist who combines creativity with an important environmental solution; the creation of artificial coral reefs from statues he’s cast from live models. When algae overtakes the reefs however, experts provide the facts about the perilous situation coral reefs currently face and solutions necessary to save them. Peter Coyote generously provides insightful narration that leaves viewers pondering our connection to this valuable and beautiful ecosystem.” – From the website.


Peter Pan (1953)

Aug
10
5:30 pm





Sunday, August 10Peter-pan-disney-poster-cartel-6resize

Doors at 5:30 PM

Movie at 6:00 PM

Film is $5

Rated Approved

All children grow up except one.

“A pet project of Walt Disney’s since 1939, … The straightforward story concerns the Darling family, specifically the children: Wendy, Michael and John. Wendy enjoys telling her younger siblings stories about the mythical Peter Pan, the little boy who never grew up. One night, much to everyone’s surprise, Peter flies into the Darling nursery, in search of his shadow, which Wendy had previously captured. Sprinkling the kids with magic pixie dust, Peter flies off to Never-Never Land, with Wendy, Michael and John following behind. Once in Peter’s domain, the children are terrorized by Captain Hook, who intends to capture Peter and do away with him. After rescuing Indian princess Tiger Lily from Captain Hook, Peter must save the children, not to mention his own “Lost Boys,” from the diabolical pirate captain. In addition, he must contend with the jealousy of tiny sprite Tinker Bell, who doesn’t like Wendy one little bit. … Adding to the fun are the spirited voiceover performances by Bobby Driscoll (Peter), Hans Conried (Captain Hook and Mr. Darling), Kathryn Beaumont (Wendy) and Bill Thompson (Smee), and the sprightly songs by Sammy Cahn, Sammy Fain, Ollie Wallace, Erdman Penner, Ted Sears, Winston Hibler, Frank Churchill and Jack Lawrence.” ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi


 


Revolt of the Zombies (1936)

Aug
13
6:00 pm





Wednesday, August 13Revolt-of-the-Zombies-poster-3resize

Doors at 6 PM

All ages

FREE with minimum $5 food or beverage purchase

Beer and Pizza specials all night long!

The best in B science fictions movies, drive-in classics, psychotronic weirdness and more. A free raffle before the feature include some very cool, very strange science fiction prizes including figurines, posters, books, cards, VHS movies and more for that inner science fiction enthusiast in us all.Sponsored by La Dolce Video, Savage Henry Magazine, Scrap Humboldt, Phantom Wave Records, Daisy Drygoods, Vintage Avenger, Tin Can Mailman, The Clothing Dock and more.

The follow-up to White Zombie!

Designed as a follow-up to the Halperin Brothers’ phenomenally successful White Zombie. The story is set in Cambodia in the years following WWI. Evil Count Mazovia (Roy D’Arcy) has come into possession of the secret methods by which dead men can be transformed into walking zombies and uses these unholy powers to create a race of slave laborers. An expedition is sent to the ruins of Angkor Wat, in hopes of ending Mazovia’s activities once and for all. Unfortunately, Armand (Dean Jagger), one of the members of the expedition, has his own agenda. Stealing a set of secret tablets, he sets about to create his own army of zombies, targeting those whom he considers to be enemies. But Armand is hoist on his own petard when the zombies rebel and turn against him.

Here is a short clip from the film.


American Pop (1981)

Aug
15
7:30 pm





Sunday, August 15American Pop posterresize

Doors at 7:30 PM

Movie at 8:00 PM

Film is $5

Rated R

“The rise and growth of American popular music through the 20th century is reflected in the lives of four generations of one family in this animated drama directed by Ralph Bakshi. Zalmie (voice of Jeffrey Lippa), a Russian Jew, emigrates to America, and tries to struggle along as a comic and musician in vaudeville, until an injury suffered in World War I ends his singing career. Zalmie’s son Benny (voice of Richard Singer) inherits his father’s love for music, and when he grows to adulthood, he joins a jazz combo as a pianist; his career is cut short, however, when he’s killed while fighting in World War II. Benny’s son Tony (voice of Ron Thompson) is also bitten by the music bug and is determined to make his mark as a songwriter; he becomes involved in the Beat poetry and music community in San Francisco, and later falls in with a pioneering psychedelic band. Along the way, Tony fathers an illegitimate son named Pete (voice of Eric Taslitz), and ends up becoming Pete’s guardian in New York City without realizing he’s the boy’s father. After Tony’s death, Pete supports himself by dealing drugs, while struggling to make his dream of becoming a rock star a reality. Ralph Bakshi achieved American Pop’s unique look through a process called “rotoscoping” — shooting the scenes with live actors, and then tracing their movements onto animation cells.” ~ Mark Deming, Rovi


Matilda (1996)

Aug
17
5:30 pm





Sunday, August 17MatildaPosterresize

Doors at 5:30 PM

Movie at 6:00 PM

Film is $5

Rated PG

Somewhere inside all of us is the power to change the world.

“Based on the book Matilda, by British children’s author Roald Dahl, this film moves the setting from the U.K. to the U.S.; otherwise it follows the original closely. Matilda Wormwood (Mara Wilson) is an extremely curious and intelligent little girl who is very different from her low-brow, mainstream parents (Danny DeVito and real-life wife Rhea Perlman), who quite cruelly ignore her. As she grows older, she begins to discover that she has telekinetic powers. Not until a teacher shows her kindness for the first time does she realize that she can use those powers to do something about her sufferings and help her friends as well. Villains from the awful Miss Trunchbull (Pam Ferris), headmistress of her miserable school Crunchem Hall, to her parents and older brother begin to feel her ire. Look for Paul Reubens (aka Pee Wee Herman) in a small part as an FBI agent investigating Matilda’s shady father.” ~ Clarke Fountain, Rovi


Atom Age Vampire (1960)

Aug
20
6:00 pm





Wednesday, August 20atom-age-vampire-posterresize

Doors at 6 PM

All ages

FREE with minimum $5 food or beverage purchase

Beer and Pizza specials all night long!

The best in B science fictions movies, drive-in classics, psychotronic weirdness and more. A free raffle before the feature include some very cool, very strange science fiction prizes including figurines, posters, books, cards, VHS movies and more for that inner science fiction enthusiast in us all.Sponsored by La Dolce Video, Savage Henry Magazine, Scrap Humboldt, Phantom Wave Records, Daisy Drygoods, Vintage Avenger, Tin Can Mailman, The Clothing Dock and more.

Horror is only skin deep!

“A less-stylish variant on Franju’s classic Les Yeux Sans Visage, this low-budget Italian production borrows heavily from that film’s plot to tell the tale of a scientist who employs a radical new procedure to restore the beauty of a young hoochie-koochie dancer disfigured in a car accident. All goes well after the bandages come off… but after all, this is a horror film, and it’s only a matter of time before the young lass begins transforming into a monster — which, despite the title, is not really a vampire, but more like something resembling an overcooked pizza roll with eyes. In order to return her to normal, the loony doc sets out to “borrow” the faces of other young women without their permission. Released in its native country (where the dubbing might have been a bit less painful) as Seddock, L’Ereda de Satana or Seddock, Heir of Satan.” ~ Cavett Binion, Rovi


Girls Night Out: Showgirls (1995)

Aug
22
7:30 pm





Friday, August 22showgirls1resize

Doors at 5:30 PM

Movie at 6:00 PM

Film is $5

Rated NC-17

The Arcata Theatre Lounge presents Girls Night Out featuring Showgirls (1995). 

“”I’m gonna dance,” Nomi Malone (Elizabeth Berkley) insists in the opening scene of Showgirls, and dance she does. In this quasi-update of All About Eve, Nomi is a drifter whose sole ambition is to headline the “Goddess” topless dance show at the Stardust in Las Vegas. Of course, even Nomi must pay her dues, and she does so at the Cheetah, grinding poles and lap dancing her way to a future. Fortunately, her roommate, Molly, works at the Stardust and invites Nomi to see the show, where she meets Crystal Conners (Gina Gershon, in the Bette Davis role), with whom she immediately forms a love/hate relationship. Nomi soon learns what she must do to get ahead, and the rest of the film documents her cat-like crawl up the showgirl ladder of success. Directed by Paul Verhoeven, (Robocop, Basic Instinct, The Fourth Man), Showgirls was conceived as the first big-budget “adult” film since 1977′s Caligula, and the first such production to wear the NC-17 rating; its failure at the box-office discouraged further attempts at large-scale adult productions.” ~ Dylan Wilcox, Rovi


Mary Poppins (1964)

Aug
24
5:30 pm





Sunday, August 24Poster-Mary-Poppins_01resize

Doors at 5:30 PM

Movie at 6:00 PM

Film is $5

Rated Approved

It’s supercalifragilisticexpialidocious!

“Long resistant to film adaptations of her Mary Poppins books, P.L. Travers finally succumbed to the entreaties of Walt Disney, and the result is often considered the finest of Disney’s personally supervised films. The Travers stories are bundled together to tell the story of the Edwardian-era British Banks family: the banker father (David Tomlinson), suffragette mother (Glynis Johns), and the two “impossible” children (Karen Dotrice and Matthew Garber). The kids get the attention of their all-business father by bedevilling every new nanny in the Banks household. Whem Mr. Banks advertises conventionally for another nanny, the kids compose their own ad, asking for someone with a little kindness and imagination. Mary Poppins (Julie Andrews in her screen debut) answers the children’s ad by arriving at the Banks home from the skies, parachuting downward with her umbrella. She immediately endears herself to the children. 

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The next day the children meet Mary’s old chum Bert (Dick Van Dyke), currently employed as a sidewalk artist. Mary, Bert, and the children hop into one of Bert’s chalk drawings and learn the nonsense song “Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious” in a cartoon countryside. Later, they pay a visit to Bert’s Uncle Albert (Ed Wynn), who laughs so hard that he floats to the ceiling. Mr. Banks is pleased that his children are behaving better, but he’s not happy with their fantastic stories. To show the children what the real world is like, he takes them to his bank. A series of disasters follow which result in his being fired from his job. Mary Poppins’ role in all this leads to some moments when it is possible to fear that all her good work will be undone, but like the magical being she is, all her “mistakes” lead to a happy result by the end of the film. In 2001, Mary Poppins was rereleased in a special “sing-along” edition with subtitles added to the musical numbers so audiences could join in with the onscreen vocalists.” ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi


A Hard Day’s Night (1964)

Aug
29
7:30 pm





Sunday, August 29a-hard-days-night-poster1resize

Doors at 7:30 PM

Movie at 8:00 PM

Film is $5

Rated Approved

They’ve been working like dogs.

The year is 1964 and four young lads from Liverpool are about to change the world – if only the madcap world will let them out of their hotel room. Richard Lester’s boldly contemporary rock n’ roll comedy unleashes the fledgling Beatles into a maelstrom of screaming fans, paranoid producers, rabid press and troublesome family members, and reveals the secret of their survival and success: an insatiable lust for mischief and a life-affirming addiction to joy.

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The plot is a study of a day in the life of the Fab Four beginning with them running from their adoring fans to catch a train. Every plot point circles around the band getting to a television show in order to perform a live concert, and within this stream of action is a series of slapstick, zany, and otherwise wacky bits of funniness. One obstacle in the works is Paul McCartney’s babysitting of his grandfather (Wilfrid Brambell), a first class mixer always getting into mischief. It becomes one of the running jokes in the film that Brambell is a “clean old man,” at least physically (this contrasts with Brambell’s most famous role as Albert Steptoe in Steptoe and Son where he was a “dirty old man” both physically and psychologically). Ringo Starr gets a sense of liberation and goes off on his own to find happiness only to land in jail for loitering. John Lennon fires playful barbs at TV director (Victor Spinetti), whose biggest worry is that if for some reason the Beatles stand him up his next job will be doing “news in Welsh.” One great story line is with George Harrison, in which he is mistaken for an actor auditioning for some trendy TV show for some trend setter hostess. The earnest demeanor of the casting head and his associates is undercut by George’s declaration that she is a well-known drag. Norman Rossington and John Junkin as The Beatles’ managers are stalwart English character actors who fill out the cast and support the general lunacy of the film with a more traditional presence, but still sustain an on-going battle about one being taller than the other. Anna Quayle has a great bit with John Lennon about his being someone he’s not. The whole thing ends with an ear-shattering concert and the band yet again running from the adoring fans.